fast company made me cry today part.1

Fast Company magazine has found a permanent place in my heart.

I started reading business magazines when I was 19; I had always been interested in success and the people {especially the women!} who were successful. I was curious about their habits, their personal journeys and the lessons they learned on their way up the ladder.  What books did they read? What moments changed their lives? What type of education did they have? Etc…The education part was always a tricky one for me. I valued learning but I hated school. While it was clear I was smart to everyone, my intelligence did not fit perfectly into the confines of my local french immersion public school. The intelligence that came so naturally to me, hadn’t been formally named or lauded as yet. I was still just the kid with a lot of potential who talked way too much and used her gut more than her head.

Eventually, I found out that I had something useful called a high emotional intelligence. I found out that being very comfortable socially and unusually intuitive with people’s needs had value for a budding entrepreneur. The cautionary items on my report cards turned out to be strengths. And these traits have made me strong and successful in all aspects of my life.

So why was I crying?

I cried because back in April {it came across my fb newsfeed today}, Fast Company did a piece called 7 Habits of Highly Emotional Intelligent People and I felt so many pieces of my life come together in one neatly written blog post. Business magazines are great guys, but depending on your natural strengths you may feel like they are written for other people. Reading about CV perfect educations, incredible focus and linear thinking may feel alienating at times but I have to tell you something…

we are all capable of success.

Figure out your strengths; understand how they work and how to apply them to your business. Then examine your weaknesses; distinguish between what you can really improve on and what you should delegate to others {…possibly forever}. But don’t waste your time feeling like there is no seat for you at the table.

My highly emotional intelligent self says make your own d*mn chair.

am.xo

p.s. I will share an excerpt from the actual article in part 2.

p.s.s. just in case you didn’t know… Emotional intelligence {EI} is the ability to monitor one’s own and other people’s emotions, to discriminate between different emotions and label them appropriately, and to use emotional information to guide thinking and behavior. There are three models of EI. The ability model, developed by Peter Salovey and John Mayer, focuses on the individual’s ability to process emotional information and use it to navigate the social environment.The trait model as developed by Konstantin Vasily Petrides, “encompasses behavioral dispositions and self perceived abilities and is measured through self report”. The final model, the mixed model is a combination of both ability and trait EI. It defines EI as an array of skills and characteristics that drive leadership performance, as proposed by Daniel Goleman.

Studies have shown that people with high EI have greater mental health, exemplary job performance, and more potent leadership skills. Markers of EI and methods of developing it have become more widely coveted in the past few decades. 

{source for this definition wikipedia}

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