how to avoid value migration

{inspiration: How to Drive Value Your Way by Michael G. Jacobides & John Paul MacDuffie, Harvard Business Review July/August 2013}

It is important to understand that you have control over your perceived value. In fact, I would argue that it is the most important tool you have in this highly competitive marketplace. So how do you avoid value migration? Here are 3 rules {of their 4} researched and gathered by the HBR for companies to use, with an Alicia Mathlin™ remix to serve your needs as an individual.

  1. Be The Least Replaceable Player – Make sure you know your actual value to the people that matter and then explore what you can do to become more valuable. Are you assertive? Reliable? Solution and results oriented? Are you a clear asset to the team? Or to your clients? Be honest with yourself when you answer these questions. Then do the work to become that player. Only you can make those moves – never wait for someone to tell you or suggest how you can improve. If that’s happening you are way behind. Get on it.
  2. Become The Guardian of Quality – Are you known for quality? Because value migrates to the person associated most with quality. What’s your output like? Are you consistently putting out your best? Can you be considered a ‘quality guarantor’? By becoming this person you are also going to be tasked with more responsibility/liability but I find this level of involvement also leads to leadership {and that’s what we’re after right?}. Don’t be afraid to put yourself out there if you are competent and confident.
  3. Follow The Customer {company, boss, etc…}  – People change as their needs change and with it, what they value can change. Are you ready for that possibility? Are you paying attention to the direction things are moving in? To be valuable, you need to be ahead of the game. You need to show your ability to anticipate and prepare for what’s next. It is only enough to be good at what’s happening right now but it is exceptional to be the person figuring out how to monetize what the future holds.

#GETITGIRL

the power of a slight shift

“…when two people meet, if there’s rapport, the person who is most certain will always influence the other person…”

 

 

getting out of the weeds

 

More Mel Robbins because she nails it in 5 minutes.

I attribute my success to this:
I never gave or took any excuse.

–Florence Nightingale

how to stop screwing yourself

 

Meet Mel Robbins. I’ve just discovered her work and I love this talk for you {especially on a Monday}. You need to know about her 5 second rule to stop screwing yourself. It’s easy, it makes sense and it works. We can call it my new favourite thing. More on Mel to come, but for now…dig into this.

am.xo

on being relentless

I think of the word relentless and I think of a character trait that women have been socialized to avoid. We never want to seem harsh or inflexible. The very thought of a woman being incessant in the pursuit of her goals almost automatically brings up the B word. Not to me. But to many of us and to society at large, this is true. So my question is…

Is being relentless necessary?

To be honest, adopting or teaching this skill had never crossed my mind until I came across the book Relentless: From Good to Great to Unstoppable by Tim S. Grover. In a nutshell, the man responsible for the sports performance and motivation of Micheal Jordan, Kobe Bryant, Dwayne Wade and other high calibre athletes wrote a book on what it takes to achieve that kind of success. THAT KIND OF SUCCESS. You know what I mean right? I’m not talking about a few wins, I’m talking about winning over and over again. I’m talking about winning so much that losing is a surprise to you. THAT KIND OF SUCCESS.

I picked up the book and could not put it down but by the end of it I understood 2 things very clearly:

  1. By saying that being relentless is only socially acceptable in men, we are doing a tremendous disservice to women and girls.
  2. I have not even scratched the surface of my potential and neither have you. Trust me. {gulp, it’s a tough one to swallow}.

The book was intimidating, motivating, useful and certainly not for the faint of heart. The book is a cold hard slap to the ego. If you think, as I did, that great should be good enough than this book is not for you. If you are interested in the extent of what is possible for you, and are not anxious about what that says about where you are right now, then brace yourself, and read this book.

Some important takeaways from Relentless: From Good to Great to Unstoppable by Tim S. Grover:

  • crave the end result so intensely that the work is irrelevant
  • do the hardest things first, just to show there’s no task too big
  • you can’t commit to excellence until your mind is ready to take you there
  • you keep pushing yourself harder when everyone else has had enough
  • you make decisions, not suggestions

And to answer the question, YES! I believe that being relentless in the pursuit of your highest potential is necessary for women.

Now more than ever. Get the book HERE.

am.xo

Persuasion works by appealing to certain deeply rooted human responses. Robert Cialdini, author of the book Influence, has identified 6 of those responses:

  1. LIKING – if people like you – because they sense that you like them, or because of things you have in common – they’re  more apt to say yes to you.
  2. RECIPROCITY – People tend to return favors. If you help people, they’ll help you. If you behave in a certain way (cooperatively, for example), they’ll respond in kind.
  3. SOCIAL PROOF – People will do things they see other people doing – especially if those people seem similar to them.
  4. COMMITMENT AND CONSISTENCY – People want to be consistent, or at least to appear to be. If they make a public, voluntary commitment, they’ll try to follow through.
  5. AUTHORITY – People defer to experts and to those in positions of authority (and typically underestimate their tendency to do so).
  6. SCARCITY – People value things more if they perceive them to be scarce.

{excerpted from The Uses {and Abuses} of Influence, the Harvard Business Review, June/July 2103, p.79}

I also believe…

Character may almost be called the most effective means of persuasion.

-Aristotle

power pose: how to own it with your body language

Body language affects how others see us, but it may also change how we see ourselves. Social psychologist Amy Cuddy shows how “power posing” — standing in a posture of confidence, even when we don’t feel confident — can affect testosterone and cortisol levels in the brain, and might even have an impact on our chances for success.

{source credit: www.ted.com/talks}

a little healthy hubris is good for you

hu·bris • (h)yo͞obris/noun | a great or foolish amount of pride or confidence; it is a failure to recognize your own defects

Yes, I am asking you to embrace the concept of having a great or foolish amount of pride or confidence. Only I don’t think it is foolish at all. I believe it is necessary. I believe for us to have a fighting chance at success in all aspects of our lives, we need to go beyond the propagated idea that excessive humility and self-denigration are useful characteristics for a woman. They are not. In fact, I believe there are too many voices telling us directly and indirectly to stay small.

And I say f*ck that noise.

We have to believe in ourselves and our own abilities before anyone else can or will. We have to do this regardless of what we’ve been told to believe, raised to believe or expected to believe. Period. “Fake it until you make it” is not just a catchphrase for the self-help or sales industry, it can be a lifeline from a bumpy past to your very bright future. You have to believe in yourself. Or at least begin to try to believe, that you are the greatest thing to ever happen to your life. Because YOU ARE.

Healthy Hubris looks like:

  • asking for what you want
  • self-advocating
  • just saying thank you for a compliment {instead of explain it away}
  • prioritizing your self-care
  • celebrating other women who make it happen {until you join them}
  • challenging yourself to leap across your fear
  • trusting your instincts
  • saying NO when you want to
  • checking your negative self-talk
  • learning to praise yourself daily
  • self-love in bad*ss new way.

When was the last time “you failed to recognize your own defects?” 

HEALTHY HUBRIS. I want you to try it. 

am.xo

 

Proudly powered by WordPress
Theme: Esquire by Matthew Buchanan.