Focus on where you want to go,
not on what you fear.
― Anthony Robbins

how to start being a better + more successful human right now

I created this blog to keep your ambition heart strong + sustainable + deeply connected to your highest, grandest vision for your life. I don’t believe you have to lose yourself on your journey to success.

I believe, you have to stay aligned with your authentic self to achieve your full potential. 

I recently discovered the DO Lectures {story + link below} and have fallen in love; I am slowly making my way through the talks but this one by Maria Popova stuck out right away – Build Pockets of Stillness Into Your Life herewith and in summary, her 7 best life learnings…

  1. allow yourself the uncomfortable luxury of changing your mind
  2. do nothing out of guilt or for prestige or for status or for money or approval alone
  3. be generous with with your time and your resources and with giving credit and especially your words
  4. build pockets of stillness into your life {be disciplined about sleep + meditation}
  5. when people try to tell you who you are don’t believe them
  6. presence is far more intricate and rewarding an art than productivity
  7. expect anything worthwhile to take time

see below for Maria Popova’s entire talk

about this very special lecture series…

Clare and David Hieatt set out to bring the DO-ers of the world together – the movers and shakers, the disrupters and the change-makers – and ask them to tell their stories. Under star lit skies, in a bind with nature, they would inspire others to go out into the world and DO, too.

to see more of the DO Lectures, click here

Just make up your mind at the very outset that your work is going to stand for quality…that you are going to stamp a superior quality upon everything that goes out of your hands, that whatever you do shall bear the hallmark of excellence.
― Orison Swett Marden

hard question of the month: are you making progress or making excuses?

5 TED talks to improve your leadership skills

The first TED talk I ever saw was Brené Brown’s The Power of Vulnerability. At the time I was working on a massive project in Paris with a starting budget of over 80 million euros, the work was high pressure, challenging, empowering but at times deeply isolating. I felt vulnerable all the time and my old programmed thinking made me feel like that vulnerability made me weak. Thankfully, my husband had the insight to share Brené’s powerful words. The talk shifted my perspective on what would become my ultimate gift…to feel everything deeply + clearly.

{Herewith a collection of 5 thought shifting TED talks on leadership extracted from a curated 10 by INC magazine’s Laura Garnett, published on September 14, 2015, all text in original format, link to original article below}

Carol Dweck: The Power of Believing That You Can Improve

Unleash potential in yourself and in those you lead by encouraging a growth–rather than fixed–mindset. In this talk, Dweck discusses the power of students receiving a “Not Yet” grade versus a failing grade–it increased their motivation and ability to succeed. In another talk about mindset, Charlie Reeve found that employees with a growth mindset were constantly looking to adapt and to grow in their professional and personal worlds; they didn’t believe that their talents and futures were predetermined. Think about how you can shift your mindset to be more growth oriented. Now, imagine the results if you helped your peers and employees shift their mindset as well.

Sam Richards: A Radical Experiment in Empathy

This is, as the title suggests, a radical and often misunderstood TED Talk about the importance of putting ourselves in others’ shoes. Not only is empathy a quality of being a good person, it is also key to being a great leader. It helps us understand how to better communicate with and understand our superiors, peers, and employees. Do not underestimate this key characteristic.

Angela Lee Duckworth: The Key To Success? Grit

Duckworth defines grit as “passion and perseverance for long-term goals.” Grit is one of those intangible concepts that we still know very little about, but one thing is clear: The grittier we are, the more successful we become. This is just another reason to find your true passion and purpose in life and truly dedicate yourself to it.

Srikumar Rao: Plug Into Your Hard-Wired Happiness

I attribute my consistent, joyful attitude to what I learned about mindset and happiness from Srikumar Rao. In his TED Talk, Rao discusses how the “if-then” model of happiness is hurting our current well-being and success. Happiness is actually hardwired into us–it’s easier to achieve than you think. Think about the quality of your life and career if you were happy right now.

Brené Brown: The Power of Vulnerability

Moments of vulnerability truly are inspiring, and they make way for the possibility of even greater connection and appreciation. When you are vulnerable, when you put a name to your resistance, it can be addressed, acknowledged, and worked through. When one of my clients opens up and shows his or her vulnerable side in our work together, I know success is guaranteed.

Laura Garnett’s original 10 TED talks are posted HERE

It is an immutable law in business that words are words, explanations are explanations, promises are promises-but only performance is reality.

—Harold S. Geneen

I always love you elizabeth gilbert

how to become famous, part 2

continued from this post

11. Set up a support team. Find others like you–devoted to becoming the best in the world at their craft. And create an alliance.

12. Keep a journal. Writing in a journal each morning or every night is a superb way to build expertise. It allows for you to reflect deeply on what you’re doing right–and celebrate those wins–and what areas of performance you can most improve.

13. Remember that expertise is a process, not an event.

14. Reward your successes. Staying passionate with your field of expertise and your lofty goals is absolutely essential to getting your through the inevitable failures/plateaus and obstacles on the path to Mastery. By setting up a clear reward structure, you’ll fuel your energy and stay amped to win.

15. Read “Talent is Overrated” by Geoffrey Colvin. Superb book.

16. Stick with the new move for 66 days. According to research at The University College of London, it takes 66 days of practice to wire in a new habit. So as you work on a new element within your field of expertise, do it for 66 days until the “neural highway” in your brain has been installed. The new move will then become automatic.

17. Raise your standards. Our behavior reflects what we’ve settled for. All experts are obsessed with becoming the best there ever was. And so their performance matches that mindset.

18. Know that becoming an expert isn’t easy {otherwise everyone would be doing it}. But it’ll be truly worth it. That I promise you.

19. Clear your mind. A messy mind causes messy results. Make all efforts to have fewer goals, priorities and responsibilities so your mind becomes incredibly centered on the dominant focus of your professional life: the one field you are committed to mastering.

20. Go first-class. If you’re really serious about world-class performance then have the guts to invest in world-class training tools, world-class coaching, world-class instruments, world-class conference, world-class nutrition and a totally world-class environment to support your rise to the top.

21. Watch the uber-inspiring documentary of expertise “Jiro Dreams of Sushi”.

22. Sleep less to achieve more. Yes, sleep is essential for peak results. I get it. But too many people sleep too much. Most of the ultra achievers I work with sleep very little. They’d rather use that time to practice, study, produce awesome work, grow their fortunes, build their families and contribute beautifully to the world.

23. Understand that mastery loves the hardworking.

24. Keep the self-promises you make to yourself. It’s a fantastic way to increase self-discipline.

25. Keep a written daily schedule. The things that get scheduled are the things that get done. Expertise comes from clear and structured effort. A written schedule of your practice times, study times, coaching times as well as a listing of your other essential life commitments will ensure you’re on track.

26. Show up when you don’t feel like it. Experts don’t show up to do the work only when they feel strong, energized and excited. They show up when they’re tired, discouraged and exhausted. That’s what it takes to be the best.

27. Do it for yourself as much as for the world. Becoming an expert is one of the finest methods I know of to move toward self-mastery. The process of expressing your greatest talents and potential develops your character. You teach yourself patience, perseverance and toughen your faith. Yes, you’ll help/inspire/create value for so many people via your inevitable expertise. But don’t just do it for that. Choose it for what this uncommon journey will make of you as a person.

*edited tips; for the full article + more useful tips + tools from Robin Sharma, click HERE.

What you really believe about the source of great performance thus becomes the foundation of all you will ever achieve.

― Geoff Colvin

how to become famous, part 1

{I admit, I am really late to the Robin Sharma game but these tips* are epic…} 

1. Model the mindsets, habits and behaviors of the people performing at the level you want to play at. Surround yourself with as many world-class experts in your field as you can possibly network with.

2. Teach your craft. As you share what you’re learning about in your area of expertise, it deepens your understanding. And heightens your awareness.

3. Fail as quickly as you can. Each time you stumble, study the data, recalibrate and iterate your next move. Do this daily and you’ll see steady gains in your performance standards.

4. Become monomaniacally focused on knowing all there is to know about one or two things. The secret to Mastery is concentration of attention. Period.

5. Read. It’s something too few people do on a daily basis. Reading collapses learning time–and allows the brilliance of the best to rub off on your thinking.

6. Get a mentor. I’ve had a number of key mentors in my life and watching them show up at peak was a game-changer. You just can’t reach your personal Everest without some help.

7. Practice insane amounts of hours. Anders Ericsson is the world’s pre-eminent researcher on exceptional performance. His research {popularized by Malcolm Gladwell} showed that it takes 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to make an expert. Put in the time and out will come the expert.

8. Go to your edges. Elite athletes, violinists, writers and chess players all do the same thing: every day they have specific times that they push their skills to the edge. And by relentlessly pushing their talents past what’s comfortable, their talents quickly expand.

9. Play to win versus playing to avoid failing. Experts have a tendency to pursue their idealized image of excellence while average performers behave in a way designed to avoid making mistakes. Big difference.

10. Remember that things you once found hard you now find easy. You are built to grow, to flourish and to adapt to new standards.

for part 2 go HERE

*edited tips; for the full article + more useful tips + tools from Robin Sharma, click HERE.

hard question of the month: are you still trying to please others?

You are only as rich as
your will power.

― Wayne Chirisa

forget about likeability, it’s not serving you

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s words on likeability struck a chord for me…

I hope they speak to you as well.

“I think that what our society teaches young girls, and I think it’s also something that’s quite difficult for even older women and self-professed feminists to shrug off, is that idea that likability is an essential part of you, of the space you occupy in the world, that you’re supposed to twist yourself into shapes to make yourself likable that you’re supposed to hold back sometimes, pull back, don’t quite say, don’t be too pushy because you have to be likable.

And I say that’s bullshit.

So what I want to say to young girls is forget about likability. If you start thinking about being likable you are not going to tell your story honestly, because you are going to be so concerned with not offending, and that’s going to ruin your story so forget about likability. And also the world is such a wonderful, diverse and multifaceted place that there’s somebody who’s going to like you, you don’t need to twist yourself into shapes.”

 

hard question of the month: what does whatever it takes mean to you?

hard question of the month: are you a woman who lifts or carries?

stop talking away your credibility + value

{On Gwyneth Paltrow’s site goop.com, the BE section has done a great job of capturing things that affect women every day. So when I came across a piece titled “How Women Undermine Themselves with Words” – an interview with Tara Mohr – I thought it would be great to share this wisdom with you.}

“Here are some of the “little things” women do in speech and writing that aren’t really “little.” In fact, they have a huge impact in causing us to come across as less competent and confident:

Inserting just: “I just want to check in and see…” “I just think…” Just tends to make us sound a little apologetic and defensive about what we’re saying. Think about the difference between the sound of “I just want to check in and see…” and “I want to check in and see…” or the difference between “I just think” and “I think…”

Inserting actually: “I actually disagree…” “I actually have a question.” It actually makes us sound surprised that we disagree or have a question—not good!

Using qualifiers: “I’m no expert in this, but…” or “I know you all have been researching this for a long time, but…” undermines your position before you’ve even stated your opinion.

Asking, “Does that make sense?” or “Am I making sense?”: I used to do this all the time. We do it with good intentions: We want to check in with the other people in the conversation and make sure we’ve been clear. The problem is, “does that make sense” comes across either as condescending (like your audience can’t understand) or it implies you feel you’ve been incoherent.”

for the complete interview {which you should read!} click here

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