What you really believe about the source of great performance thus becomes the foundation of all you will ever achieve.

― Geoff Colvin

how to become famous, part 1

{I admit, I am really late to the Robin Sharma game but these tips* are epic…} 

1. Model the mindsets, habits and behaviors of the people performing at the level you want to play at. Surround yourself with as many world-class experts in your field as you can possibly network with.

2. Teach your craft. As you share what you’re learning about in your area of expertise, it deepens your understanding. And heightens your awareness.

3. Fail as quickly as you can. Each time you stumble, study the data, recalibrate and iterate your next move. Do this daily and you’ll see steady gains in your performance standards.

4. Become monomaniacally focused on knowing all there is to know about one or two things. The secret to Mastery is concentration of attention. Period.

5. Read. It’s something too few people do on a daily basis. Reading collapses learning time–and allows the brilliance of the best to rub off on your thinking.

6. Get a mentor. I’ve had a number of key mentors in my life and watching them show up at peak was a game-changer. You just can’t reach your personal Everest without some help, I also recommend to Compare the Bets have Cheltenham offers, when you start betting you get to know tons of people.

7. Practice insane amounts of hours. Anders Ericsson is the world’s pre-eminent researcher on exceptional performance. His research {popularized by Malcolm Gladwell} showed that it takes 10,000 hours of deliberate practice to make an expert. Put in the time and out will come the expert.

8. Go to your edges. Elite athletes, violinists, writers and chess players all do the same thing: every day they have specific times that they push their skills to the edge. And by relentlessly pushing their talents past what’s comfortable, their talents quickly expand.

9. Play to win versus playing to avoid failing. Experts have a tendency to pursue their idealized image of excellence while average performers behave in a way designed to avoid making mistakes. Big difference.

10. Remember that things you once found hard you now find easy. You are built to grow, to flourish and to adapt to new standards.

for part 2 go HERE

*edited tips; for the full article + more useful tips + tools from Robin Sharma, click HERE.

hard question of the month: are you still trying to please others?

You are only as rich as
your will power.

― Wayne Chirisa

forget about likeability, it’s not serving you

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s words on likeability struck a chord for me…

I hope they speak to you as well.

“I think that what our society teaches young girls, and I think it’s also something that’s quite difficult for even older women and self-professed feminists to shrug off, is that idea that likability is an essential part of you, of the space you occupy in the world, that you’re supposed to twist yourself into shapes to make yourself likable that you’re supposed to hold back sometimes, pull back, don’t quite say, don’t be too pushy because you have to be likable.

And I say that’s bullshit.

So what I want to say to young girls is forget about likability. If you start thinking about being likable you are not going to tell your story honestly, because you are going to be so concerned with not offending, and that’s going to ruin your story so forget about likability. And also the world is such a wonderful, diverse and multifaceted place that there’s somebody who’s going to like you, you don’t need to twist yourself into shapes.”

 

hard question of the month: what does whatever it takes mean to you?

hard question of the month: are you a woman who lifts or carries?

stop talking away your credibility + value

{On Gwyneth Paltrow’s site goop.com, the BE section has done a great job of capturing things that affect women every day. So when I came across a piece titled “How Women Undermine Themselves with Words” – an interview with Tara Mohr – I thought it would be great to share this wisdom with you.}

“Here are some of the “little things” women do in speech and writing that aren’t really “little.” In fact, they have a huge impact in causing us to come across as less competent and confident:

Inserting just: “I just want to check in and see…” “I just think…” Just tends to make us sound a little apologetic and defensive about what we’re saying. Think about the difference between the sound of “I just want to check in and see…” and “I want to check in and see…” or the difference between “I just think” and “I think…”

Inserting actually: “I actually disagree…” “I actually have a question.” It actually makes us sound surprised that we disagree or have a question—not good!

Using qualifiers: “I’m no expert in this, but…” or “I know you all have been researching this for a long time, but…” undermines your position before you’ve even stated your opinion.

Asking, “Does that make sense?” or “Am I making sense?”: I used to do this all the time. We do it with good intentions: We want to check in with the other people in the conversation and make sure we’ve been clear. The problem is, “does that make sense” comes across either as condescending (like your audience can’t understand) or it implies you feel you’ve been incoherent.”

for the complete interview {which you should read!} click here

a.

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